energy emergencyWatching the confusion caused by the Super Bowl power outage reminded me that we all need to be prepared to deal with unexpected interruptions to our electrical service. I was reminded of this again this weekend, when my lights went out as a blizzard blanketed New England with over two feet of snow.

The Blizzard of 2013 shut down our roads and caused power outages for hundreds of thousands of people, including some of us at Information Mapping.  A catastrophic event like this can test any organization’s emergency planning capabilities. But it presents special challenges for those in the energy sector who need to align their efforts with those of public sector response teams and work to Incident Command Systems (ICS) standards.

In this blog I’ve often talked about how the Information Mapping method helps solve different business communications problems, but none are more critical than your organization’s contingency plans, emergency operations procedures, ICS training documentation and other incident management communications. Whether a stadium blackout leaves 108 million viewers wondering what will happen next or a blizzard shuts off the power to 400,000 homes, fixing the problem means communicating quickly, clearly and effectively.

Our structured authoring method was developed specifically to aid comprehension and support performance in situations where there’s simply no margin for error. If you’re looking for a way to improve your organization’s capability to respond quickly and correctly to the next emergency situation, I invite you to get in touch. We can help ensure that you’ll be ready.

To see a Before & After example of emergency operations documentation prepared using the Information Mapping method, click here and download the file called Spills and Releases.