Taco Salad, the Information Mapping Way

tacosalad

The Information Mapping method is best known for its success as a business communications methodology, but it can make life easier for you outside the office, too. Right now we’re in the middle of the summer vacation season, so here’s an application for the Method that’s definitely not work-related, and all about summer fun.

Recipes and the Information Mapping® method

If there’s a “civilian” application for the Information Mapping method that beats writing up recipes, nobody’s told us about it. The Method provides an ideal standard for creating clear, easy-to-follow procedures, and there’s simply no better way to capture a good recipe than to Map it.

We’re speaking from experience, because several years ago we published Mapper’s Morsels, a collection of favorite recipes from our instructors and consultants. Recipes and the Information Mapping method are a perfect match.

Capture your favorite recipes: a model document to get you started

This summer, use your Mapping skills to write up the instructions for making a favorite dish or dessert. The Method will help ensure excellent results, even if you share your recipe with a chef who isn’t quite ready to launch his or her own Food Network program.

To help you get started, here’s a summer recipe from Mapper’s Morsels. This taco salad is easy to make and a perfect side dish for your next barbecue or picnic. It’s also designed as a model document, so you can use this Map’s structure to capture other recipes of your own. You can probably think of a few that everyone in the family agrees should be written down “someday.” Once you’ve begun, you’ll see why we say that this is such a great application for the Information Mapping method.

Recipe

Have you found another great “civilian” application for the Method? We’d like to hear from you.

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Comments 5

Guest - Mark Joyce on Wednesday, 25 July 2012 22:17

The baby boomers would benefit from this layout printed in a larger readable font on 5.5 x 8.5 card stock punched for a small three-ring binder.

Could this portend the end of recipe cards as we've come to know them?

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The baby boomers would benefit from this layout printed in a larger readable font on 5.5 x 8.5 card stock punched for a small three-ring binder. Could this portend the end of recipe cards as we've come to know them?
Guest - Brian on Thursday, 26 July 2012 17:11

You cannot assume that your reader knows how to cook, or whether to ‘chop’ the scallions like they saw the guy ‘chopping’ barbeque at the restaurant.
This description does not match the Photo of a Taco Salad on this page.
No direction the Size of ‘diced’, ‘chopped’, etc. Some people ‘dice’ a tomato into 4 or 6 large pieces, vs. ¼” – ¾” pieces. Chopped Scallions; into 3rds, Qtrs, etc. vs. 1/8” – ¼” pieces?
Step 1; Brown the hamburger then drain. Won't it get cold left in the colander?
Step 2; Add Taco seasoning [to the pan?] and simmer.
When does the hamburger go back into the pan?
Step 3; Place Layer of Lettuce in the bottom of the bowl, then a layer of scallions, covered by a layer of tomatoes, covered by hamburger, covered by cheese, then [crushed] Doritos, and start again w/ lettuce, then scallions, etc. as above.
Why the meticulous [time added] layering if it all gets ‘tossed’ after adding the salad dressing?
As the former Quality Mgr of a Japanese Co in the US, I learned never to assume anything was ‘common’ knowledge. But this is a good start.

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You cannot assume that your reader knows how to cook, or whether to ‘chop’ the scallions like they saw the guy ‘chopping’ barbeque at the restaurant. This description does not match the Photo of a Taco Salad on this page. No direction the Size of ‘diced’, ‘chopped’, etc. Some people ‘dice’ a tomato into 4 or 6 large pieces, vs. ¼” – ¾” pieces. Chopped Scallions; into 3rds, Qtrs, etc. vs. 1/8” – ¼” pieces? Step 1; Brown the hamburger then drain. Won't it get cold left in the colander? Step 2; Add Taco seasoning [to the pan?] and simmer. When does the hamburger go back into the pan? Step 3; Place Layer of Lettuce in the bottom of the bowl, then a layer of scallions, covered by a layer of tomatoes, covered by hamburger, covered by cheese, then [crushed] Doritos, and start again w/ lettuce, then scallions, etc. as above. Why the meticulous [time added] layering if it all gets ‘tossed’ after adding the salad dressing? As the former Quality Mgr of a Japanese Co in the US, I learned never to assume anything was ‘common’ knowledge. But this is a good start.
Guest - Kate on Thursday, 02 August 2012 01:20

Brian, good grief! Nit pick much? Also, not much of a help in the kitchen, are you?
Any book of recipes assumes the reader has basic skills and knows how to chop, dice, etc. The size of the pieces doesn't matter, else it would be included.
Draining browned meat means you leave the meat in the pan and drain the grease out.
Get thee to a cooking class!

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Brian, good grief! Nit pick much? Also, not much of a help in the kitchen, are you? Any book of recipes assumes the reader has basic skills and knows how to chop, dice, etc. The size of the pieces doesn't matter, else it would be included. Draining browned meat means you leave the meat in the pan and drain the grease out. Get thee to a cooking class!
Guest - Bev on Sunday, 12 August 2012 15:39

This is pretty cool. Brian, I get what your are saying...you are an Info Mapping purist.

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This is pretty cool. Brian, I get what your are saying...you are an Info Mapping purist.
Guest - Hrishi on Tuesday, 09 October 2012 07:38

Nice one. Also, I don't blame Brian, he's been working for a Jap company. He is bound to be a stickler.

Brian, I bet you are a virgo,

Jokes apart, although I like the article, I must agree with Brian, the steps can be misleading.

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Nice one. Also, I don't blame Brian, he's been working for a Jap company. He is bound to be a stickler. Brian, I bet you are a virgo, :p Jokes apart, although I like the article, I must agree with Brian, the steps can be misleading.
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